The Whole Thing

Reciprocal Uncles

CD Dicipack
Feb 2020

Rendi forti i vecchi sogni
Perché questo nostro mondo non perda coraggio
A lume spento

Make-strong old dreams
Lest this our world lose hearth
With tapers quenched

To understand each other implicitly is a serendipitous event in our life. It is a thing that is born and strengthens over time, gradually succeeding in the task of showing us unknown things about ourselves: the person with whom we relate acts as a magic means of transferring and at the same time receiving the unknown feelings of the other. This relationship is stronger when the two people love the arts: Gianni Mimmo and Gianni Lenoci shared music for 10 years, their music and that of the artists they loved, working with complementary means in a communion of abstract-art jazz, artistic sensitivity, coherence. What Mimmo and Lenoci were working on, before the pianist's untimely demise, was a precious fusion of perspectives to be developed through free and vibrant interventions on their instruments: The Whole Thing is the excellent posthumous CD of Reciprocal Uncles, a place of musical delicacies played in the form of a suite, over 50 minutes in which we can feel the implicit pact between the two musicians, their particular complicity, their instrumental evolutions embedded in a global result, an intense, differentiated, courageous flow, full of freedom: in practice, the revelation of that transfer mentioned above, the truth embodied in the creative experience. Through the exchange of  instant composition, the two musicians "read" each other, they do justice to a dream that has long been linked to a different interpretation of music and art: an immensity that immediately becomes a noble and new heritage.
Ettore Garzia, Jan.2020

This album is respectfully dedicated to the memory of my beloved Reciprocal Uncle Gianni Lenoci.
Not easy to let you go.

Tracklist

1. The Whole Thing [50:48]

Credits

Gianni Lenoci: piano
Gianni Mimmo: soprano saxophone

Music by Gianni Lenoci and Gianni Mimmo
Recorded on May 17, 2019 at Wave Ahead studio, Monopoli, Italy, 
Sound Engineering, mixing and mastering: Mimmo Galizia
Cover artwork: Lazlo Moholy-Nagy “A19”,1927, oil and graphite on canvas
Inside photo: Shanu
Cd Photo: “Brooklyn Transfiguration” 2011, shot by a visitor at the Moma-PS1 museum, Queens, NY
Poem: Ezra Pound “A Lume Spento / With Tapers Quenched”,1908
Graphics: Nicola Guazzaloca
Production: Gianni Mimmo for Amirani Records

This album is respectfully dedicated to the memory of my beloved Reciprocal Uncle Gianni Lenoci. 
Not easy to let you go.

The Whole Thing

Reciprocal Uncles - The Whole Thing by Amirani Records

Avant Music News
Daniel Barniero

When pianist/composer Gianni Lenoci died last year at age 56, improvised music lost a major voice. Lenoci earned conservatory degrees in piano performance and electronic music, but he also studied improvisation with pianists Mal Waldron and Paul Bley. He played with many of the great improvisers, among whom were Steve Lacy, Roscoe Mitchell, Markus Stockhausen, Enrico Rava, and John Tchicai, but the improviser with whom he had perhaps the deepest connection was soprano saxophonist Gianni Mimmo. On The Whole Thing, the uncanny chemistry Lenoci and Mimmo shared manifests itself in a single, fifty minute-long improvisation recorded in May 2019 in Lenoci’s hometown of Monopoli, Apulia.

The excellent rapport between Lenoci and Mimmo is apparent from the first note. The music is always assured and imbued with purpose—and even though it was completely improvised, it moves with an implicit sense of structure that always seems to know exactly where it needs to go next. The two voices range over a variety of ambiences including an extroverted expressionism, the reserved abstraction of a dynamically controlled atonality, and a quiet introspection. Both Lenoci and Mimmo are fluent in the two major modern musical languages of the postwar classical and jazz avant-gardes. Lenoci’s pianism is highly chromatic, often fragmented and always precise. His sound here as elsewhere is permeated by the phrasing and textural sensibility of classical experimentalism—no surprise, since he was a noted interpreter of New York school composers Morton Feldman and Earle Brown, important works of whose he recorded and released. Mimmo’s playing is, as always, liquidly lyrical and marked by a strong sense of melodic continuity and a refined tone.

The Whole Thing ends on a contemplative note that carries a striking poignancy. For, only four months after the recording was made, Lenoci was dead. This album is a remarkable memorial to that remarkable talent.

Percorsi Musicali
Ettore Garzia

Intendersi è una splendida causalità della nostra vita. È una cosa che nasce e si rafforza nel tempo, riuscendo gradualmente a mostrarci le cose sconosciute di noi stessi: la persona con cui ci relazioniamo agisce come un mezzo magico di trasferimento e allo stesso tempo riceve i sentimenti sconosciuti dell’altro. Questa relazione è più forte quando le due persone amano l’arte: Gianni Mimmo e Gianni Lenoci hanno condiviso la musica per 10 anni, la loro musica e quella degli artisti amati, lavorando con mezzi complementari in una comunione di arte astratta jazz, sensibilità artistica, coerenza. Ciò a cui Mimmo e Lenoci stavano lavorando, prima della prematura scomparsa del pianista, era una preziosa fusione di prospettive da sviluppare attraverso interventi liberi e vibranti sugli strumenti: The Whole thing è l’eccellente postumo dei Reciprocal Uncles, un luogo di prelibatezze musicali suonato in forma di suite, oltre 50 minuti in cui si avverte il patto implicito dei due musicisti, la loro particolare complicità, le evoluzioni strumentali incorporate in un risultato globale, un flusso intenso, differenziato, coraggioso, pieno di libertà: in pratica la rivelazione di quel trasferimento di cui si diceva prima, la verità incarnata nell’esperienza creativa. Attraverso lo scambio della composizione istantanea, i due musicisti si “leggono” l’un l’altro, rendono giustizia ad un sogno che è stato a lungo collegato ad una diversa interpretazione della musica e dell’arte: un’immensità che diventa immediatamente un patrimonio nobile e nuovo.